FANDOM


For the American Mitsubishi fixtures, Please refer to List of Mitsubishi elevator fixtures (North America).This is a list of Mitsubishi Electric elevator fixtures found in most part of Asia, as well as Europe and South America. Note that all of the fixtures listed below do not have official names.

1960s

Black buttons

These fixtures consists of simple non-illuminating black buttons and analogue floor counter with illuminating circles on the car station.

Pop out buttons

These non-illuminating black buttons would latched on when pressed and popped out when the elevator stopped at the selected floor. They could also be pulled out to cancel car call.

【更新前後比較】銀座カレラ弐番館ビルのエレベーター

【更新前後比較】銀座カレラ弐番館ビルのエレベーター

1963 Mitsubishi elevator with pop-out buttons at Ginza Carrera Nibankan Building, Tokyo, Japan (now modernized as seen in the video)

Small white buttons

These are small white buttons with the number printed on them. These buttons also doubles as an analogue floor indicator as there was no interior floor indicator. Each button light up as the car goes up and down, but don't light up if pressed.

Larger white buttons

A few Mitsubishi elevators from the late 1960s had larger white round buttons which actually illuminated if pressed. These buttons were mostly used in mid and high-rise elevators.

Triangle call buttons

These were illuminating triangle shaped call buttons that protruded from the panel.

Square call buttons

There were square buttons that were made of glass-like plastic with a triangle arrow. They light up green for up and red for down. Only a few 1960s Mitsubishi elevators used this type of buttons.

Vandal resistant buttons

In the 1960s, Mitsubishi also made vandal-resistant buttons with a small light bulb, but they were not as common as the standard white buttons. These buttons are extremely rare.

Hall and car floor indicator

These were all analogue displays. There are three variants of these floor indicators; one is a simple floor counter with illuminating numbers (which actually belongs to Hitachi), one with illuminating circles, and one with illuminating squares. The illuminating circle variant ones were mostly used on the hall/landing stations, positioned vertically above the call button. The illuminating square variant is the rarer ones; they were commonly found in mid and high-rise elevators. Note that interior floor indicators were not available for many standard Mitsubishi elevators in the 1960s. As the result, the floor buttons inside doubles as an analogue indicator.

1970s

Round buttons

These are round white buttons with a black halo and illuminated by a conventional bulb, similar to Westinghouse's AE buttons. The landing call button has a green arrow for up and a red arrow for down. On some elevators installed in the 1970s where there are no car floor indicators, the floor buttons functions as floor indicators and do not lights up when they are pressed[1]. In addition, Dewhurst chassis were also provided as well as building owner's request.[2].

Square call buttons

These buttons are found in some mid to high-rise elevators. They are made of clear glass-like plastic with a metal triangle-shaped arrow placed in the middle of the button. They lights up in green for up and red for down. Some of them even light up in yellow, but it is rare.

Touch sensitive buttons

These are square touch sensitive buttons with am illuminating halo. Mitsubishi also made a rounded version of these buttons but they weren't as common as the square ones, hence they are very rare.

Vandal-resistant fixtures

In the 1960s and possibly 1970s, Mitsubishi also made vandal-resistant buttons with a small light bulb. These buttons are extremely rare

Floor indicators

Mitsubishi used analogue display floor indicators in the 1970s. There are two types of indicators; one is a long black display with illuminating numbers, and the second one is a set of illuminating squares with the number and arrow printed on them. These are found on either the landing station or above the landing door for the outside, and above the car door for the inside. On some elevators, the landing stations for intermediate floors has only direction indicators instead of a full number set. There are also elevators which did not have an interior floor indicator. For these elevators, the floor buttons inside doubles as a floor indicator, with each button illuminate as the car goes up and down, but does not illuminate if it is pressed. The reason for this is probably because an interior floor indicator was an optional feature at that time.

Hall lanterns

Mitsubishi used triangle shaped lanterns which light up green for up and red for down. There are also lanterns combined with analogue indicators.

1980s

Round buttons

Mitsubishi continued making the 1970s round white buttons in the 1980s until the late 1990s[4]. By this time, a black version of these buttons became available; these had illuminating number over a black background. These buttons also had updated triangle arrows for the landing call buttons.

Touch sensitive buttons

These are the same as the 1970s touch sensitive buttons.

Black round buttons

Mitsubishi introduced these buttons sometimes in the mid 1980s, which were black buttons with an orange illuminating number and symbol. The panel is black, with a metal frame on both sides.

Square/round call buttons

These buttons were used in some conventional low to mid-rise and high-rise elevators in the 1980s. The buttons are made of clear glass-like plastic an arrow. They light up green for up and red for down. Mitsubishi also made another version of these button with an illuminating halo and transparent arrow. Round version also exist but these are extremely rare.

Floor indicators

Mitsubishi still used analogue indicators in the 1980s. The long black floor counter inside the car was updated so that it become integrated with the transom panel above the door. In addition, the illuminating numbers became smaller and used a different typeface. By the mid 1980s, a digital 7-segments display became available.

Hall lanterns

These lanterns are arrow or triangle shaped which light up green for up, red for down and often orange for both directions. There were also custom designed lanterns based on client's requests.

Car call indicators

This is a set of illuminating circles indicating the car position, call calls (green for up and red for down) and the car position for the other elevators within the same group. These indicators are usually found in high-rise elevators with multiple elevator banks. They could also work under Attendant service.

Black square buttons

These fixtures consist of black square buttons with illuminating number when pressed, and digital floor indicator with a smaller 7-segments display. The landing stations for intermediate floors only has direction indicators.

Dumbwaiter fixtures

These are the operating fixtures for 1980s Mitsubishi dumbwaiters.

Third party/generic fixtures

Some 1980s Mitsubishi elevators installed in Hong Kong used Dewhurst, usually the US81 series push buttons.

Late 1980s to 1990s

Round buttons (1970s-1980s type)

Mitsubishi continued making the 1970s-1980s round buttons until the late 1990s. They were only used in hydraulic[4] [6], freight and vehicle elevators[7]. Some elevators have analogue indicators while some others don't; instead the floor buttons functions as an analogue floor indicator. Also, Dewhurst chassis were also provided as an option in Hong Kong.[2]. [8]

Late 1980s-early 1990s fixtures

These fixtures were made from the late 1980s until the mid 1990s. There are several designs of these fixtures:

Car station 1

This is an angled brown panel installed in the corner between the front return and side wall. It features a 16-segments indicator with a flashing number when the car is arriving. The buttons are square which light up orange when pressed. This panel comes with up to two rows of buttons. It is commonly found in low to mid-rise elevators.

Car station 2

This is a brown panel installed on either the front return wall or the side wall. It has direction indicators but no indicator. The indicator is above the car door, featuring a 10-segments display. The buttons are square which light up orange when pressed. This panel comes with up to two rows of buttons. It is commonly found in mid to high-rise and rarely low-rise elevators.

Car station 3

This is a wider stainless steel panel with a slanted floor indicator and up to three rows of floor buttons. The buttons are square which light up orange when pressed. The floor indicator is a 10-segments display, and has a green vacuum fluorescent display unde the number for displaying custom text. It looks almost like an Otis Series 1 panel. This panel is rare, and it is only found in high-rise elevators.

Car station 4

This is a stainless steel panel with either a square push button or a touch sensitive button. In addition, the floor indicator is above the car door (either segmented or analogue), hence, only direction indicators are found in the panel. This panel is common in Japan, but rarely found in other countries.

Handicap car stations

This is a small car station designed for people on wheelchair. It is surface mounted, and has square push buttons with a brown halo. Some panels also have an analogue indicator with illuminating circles.

Other styles of car station and indicators

Call stations

These are simple stainless steel call stations with either square push buttons or touch sensitive buttons. The push buttons have a wedged halo.

Hall stations

These are brown panels with analogue indicators and square push buttons. Some intermediate floor hall stations may only have direction indicators instead of a full number set.

Hall indicators

These landing/hall indicators are installed above the door. They can be segmented (with either 10 or 16 segments display) or analogue. There is also a version that comes with hall lanterns on both side of the indicator.

Hall lanterns

These lanterns use incandescent lamps. There are two versions; one is a triangle version, and the second one is a circle version.

Early-late 1990s fixtures

These fixtures were made from the early until late 1990s. The buttons are soft pressure black square buttons with an orange illuminating number/symbol. Both the door open and close buttons illuminates when pressed; the door open button, however, light up green. The floor indicators use orange LED dot matrix display which are LCD based[9], with a flashing number when the car is arriving. Dewhurst chassis were also provided as well as landlords request for this batch of fixtures.[2]

Mitsubishi made two different types of landing and car stations for these fixtures. The first one is just a basic stainless steel panel that is flushed, while the second one is a black wavy panel that is surface mounted. Both of these panels used the same type of buttons and floor indicators. There is also a smaller car station designed for people on wheelchair.

Stainless steel panel

Black panel

Hall indicators

These are flush mounted indicators which are usually installed above the landing door.

Hall lanterns

These are square lanterns made of acrylic with an arrow in the middle. They can be mounted horizontally or vertically. There is also a version that comes with a floor indicator in between the lanterns. These lanterns use incandescent lamps.

Glass tone buttons

This is a square button which, if pressed, will illuminate entirely.

American fixtures

Further information: List of Mitsubishi elevator fixtures (North America)

These fixtures were made for the American Mitsubishi elevators in the late 1980s-mid 1990s, but they were also used in very few Mitsubishi elevators installed in Asia. The buttons are square, with a braille plate attached to them. There is a white square on the button which light up orange when pressed, but this was replaced by an illuminating number for elevators installed in Japan, like the ones found in Kansai International Airport, Osaka. The floor indicators used digital segments display.

Unknown fixtures

These fixtures are very rare. The buttons are silver, round convex a with yellow orange illuminating halo. The floor indicator is a 16-segments display. Examples of these fixtures can be found at:

  • Suntec City, Singapore[10]
  • Berjaya Times Square, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia[11]
  • Bank of China Tower, Hong Kong, China[12]
  • Regal Airport Hotel - Hong Kong International Airport, Hong Kong, China

Third-party and other fixtures

Third-party fixtures

All elevators installed in government buildings and Public Housing Estates in Hong Kong were using Dewhurst fixtures, mostly the US81 braille and some of US81 Compact.

Custom fixtures

These custom fixtures were mostly made according to building owner's requests.

Dumbwaiter fixtures

These are the fixtures used for Mitsubishi dumbwaiters in the late 1980s? to 1990s.

Arrival chimes

Mitsubishi had been using mechanical bell from the early 1970s to late 1990s. By the mid 1980s, a two-tone electronic chime began appearing, which has becoming a standard feature since then. These electronic chimes sounds similar to some Otis chimes on that period but their ringing mode is quite different because Mitsubishi's chimes would ring again when you push the call buttons again (if the elevator arrived at the floor where you called and the doors opened) but Otis's chimes would ring once only when the doors open.[14]. There was also a reversed version of this chime, usually for indicating down calls. There was also a four-tone electronic chime, which also comes with a reversed version to indicate down calls. These chimes are now used on the Shanghai Mitsubishi elevators.

Late 1990s to early 2000s

These fixtures came out in 1997, and were used in Mitsubishi GPS-III, Mitsubishi GPM-III (for Asian market), GPS-IIIMZ, GPS-BIII, GPQ and GPX elevators. Mitsubishi stopped making these fixtures for new installations in the mid 2000s, except for GPM-IIIMZ high-rise modernization until around the early 2010s (probably 2011) when they were officially discontinued. In addition, Mitsubishi Hong Kong also provided Dewhurst chassis based on client's request[2].

Mitsubishi made two types of car station for these fixtures. The first one is just a standard flush mounted stainless steel panel, and the second one is a dark grey surface mounted panel. Landing stations were either flush or surface mounted, depending on the client's choice. There were also smaller car stations designed wheelchair users.

Black square buttons

These buttons are flat, with a yellow orange illuminating number/symbol.

Vandal resistant buttons

These are round buttons with a yellow illuminating line on the top of the button. Additionally, braille plate with black marking is attached to the button. These buttons could only be fitted into the flush mounted car stations.

Touch sensitive buttons

These buttons are based on the original 1970s-1980s square touch sensitive buttons, but with a different typeface. They are usually found in high-rise elevators in Japan. These buttons could only be fitted into the flush mounted car stations.

Floor indicators

These fixtures used either the standard LCD-based LED dot matrix or an LCD display for the floor indicators.

Hall lanterns

These lanterns looks the same as the ones used in the 1990s, which are made of acrylic and has an arrow in the middle. Besides these square lanterns, Mitsubishi also made several lanterns variations, often comes in different colors like green, red, or even white. There are also custom made lanterns used in some elevators.

American black round buttons

These are the same buttons as the ones used in the United States. An example of this in Asia can be found at Empire Tower in Bangkok, Thailand.

Fixtures used in Singapore HDB housing blocks

These fixtures are found in Mitsubishi elevators installed in public housing blocks built by the Housing and Development Board in Singapore. The buttons are round that protrudes from the panel, and has either an illuminating number or line above the number. The floor indicator is a Dewhurst ULS47H LED series.

Home elevator fixtures

These are the fixtures used in 2000s Mitsubishi home elevators, including those installed in Japan under the "Mitsubishi/Hitachi" brand.[15]

Early 2000s to 2010s

This fixtures lineup was introduced in 2001 as part of Mitsubishi's "Universal Design" concept of redesigning their elevators to make them easier for anyone.

Some key features of these fixtures:

  • Newly redesigned buttons in several different variants
  • Updated button typeface from Helvetica to Gill Sans Medium (does not applied for certain buttons and letter)
  • Emboissed (tactiled) button character and symbol to make it easier for the visually impaired people to operate the buttons (some buttons may not have this feature)
  • Wider door open button to prevent pressing the door close button by accident
  • LED operated button illumination, yellow orange
  • Newly redesigned floor indicator display, with:
    • Enlarged LED display on the interior floor indicator (about 1.6 larger than previous display) to make it easier to see. In addition, the arrows have been moved to the top of the number (previously it was located next to the number)
    • LCD floor indicators with a new interface

These fixtures were used in Mitsubishi Elenessa, NexWay, early Mitsubishi NEXIEZ, and GFC-L2 (freight elevator) series elevators. They were also used in the ELEMOTION (low to mid-rise) and NexWay (high-rise) modernization series. By the mid 2010s, these fixtures were no longer available for new installations. However, they are still used in certain NexWay-S, NEXIEZ-MR and -MRL as well as GFC-L2 series elevators.

Barrel shaped buttons

These are plastic, barrel shaped buttons with an orange illuminating number/symbol. These buttons uses Gill Sans Medium typeface for the number and letter, except for letter "G" which uses Helvetica. There are two versions of these buttons. The first one is the normal version, with a raised halo and an illuminating tactile. The second one is a flat button, without a tactile. On elevators with side mounted car stations, the button for the main/ground floor is green, and sticks out than the rest of the buttons. In addition, the door open button is wider, to avoid pressing the door close button by accident. Alarm button is yellow, and placed above the floor buttons except for side mounted panels where it is mounted beside the door control buttons.

Round black buttons (flat)

These buttons are flat and do not have a tactile. When pressed, the number or symbol will light up orange.

Round stainless steel buttons

These buttons are made of stainless steel mat with raised halo and a tactile which light up orange when pressed. There is also a black version of these buttons to conform disability regulations.

Black and white square buttons

These are small black and white square buttons with an orange line above the number, and don't have tactile legend. They are normally found in high rise elevators.

Glass tone plastic buttons

These are square buttons made of glass tone plastic and light orange or white. They do not have tactile.

Touch sensitive buttons (1)

These are rectangular touch sensitive buttons made of dark grey plastic.

Touch sensitive buttons (2)

These are square touch sensitive buttons with an orange illuminating halo.

Vertical rectangular buttons

These are black wedged buttons mounted vertically. These buttons appears to be exclusive to the Japanese market, and are usually found in railway stations.

Large square buttons

These buttons are usually found in railway stations in Japan.

Singaporean barrel buttons

These buttons were made exclusively for Mitsubishi elevators installed in Singapore. The buttons are grey barrel shaped with braille and yellow orange illuminating tactile. However, the door close button is not wider as opposed to the standard Mitsubishi buttons.

Custom buttons

Floor indicators

LED indicators

Mitsubishi updated their design of floor indicators on the car station with a larger LED dot matrix display, approximately 1.6 times larger than the previous display. In addition, the arrows have been moved to the top of the number.

LCD indicators

Mitsubishi also made LCD floor indicators with either a black or white background and an animating blue arrow. The typeface used is Gill Sans Medium for the number (except for certain letter like "G" which used Helvetica instead) and Helvetica for the time and date and special messages.

Hall lanterns

Mitsubishi initially used incandescent lamps for the hall lanterns. By the late 2000s, several new lantern variations with LED lamps began appearing.

Early 2010s to current

This fixtures lineup was launched in 2011 and was initially avaiable only for AXIEZ and NEXCUBE elevators in Japan. In 2013, Mitsubishi expanded these fixtures to other countries (specifically Asian countries) with the release of the NEXIEZ elevator series.

Some key features of these fixtures:

  • Newly redesigned buttons, featuring illuminating halo and number.
  • New button illuminations in white and blue (optional). The standard orange illumination remains
  • Redesigned floor indicator display. The Mitsubishi Electric logo is now visible in between the speaker and the indicator display.

These fixtures are currently used for Mitsubishi NEXIEZ-MR, NEXIEZ-MRL, NEXIEZ-GPX (Latin America), NEXIEZ-LITE (India since 2014), NEXIEZ-S, AXIEZ (Japan only), NEXCUBE (Japan only) and GFC-L3 elevators. They are also used in the current release of ELEMOTION and NexWay Modernization for modernization.

Round stainless steel buttons (Tactiled)

These are round stainless steel buttons with illuminating halo and tactile. They light up orange (standard), blue or white (optional).

Round stainless steel buttons (Flat)

These buttons are similar to round stainless steel buttons above, but without tactile.

Large square glass buttons

These buttons are only found in Japan, and are used in AXIEZ MRL and NEXCUBE elevators since 2011. They are made of glass and has illuminating lamp. Sometimes a small tactile can also be placed on the top of the buttons as an option.

Glass tone buttons

These buttons are made of glass and lights up entirely in orange, white or blue. In Japan, these buttons came out in round, and a bigger size is also produced.

Other buttons

Floor indicators

LED indicators

These indicators use either segmented display as standard feature or LED dot matrix display as an optional feature. There are also floor indicators inside the car with a glass display - these are only available in Japan.

LCD indicators

These are the same as the ones used in the previous design. In 2017, Mitsubishi updated the interface with a new V-shaped directional arrow and a different typeface.